America's Next Great Metropolis Is Taking Shape In Texas, according to Forbes Magazine

Click on the link below to read the recent article in Forbes Magazine, "The Next Great American Metropolis is taking Shape" about the Austin to San Antonio Corridor. 

In fact, there is no regional economy that has more momentum than the one that straddles the 74 miles between San Antonio and Austin. Between these two fast-growing urban centers lie a series of rapidly expanding counties and several smaller cities, notably San Marcos, that are attracting residents and creating jobs at remarkable rates.
http://www.forbes.com/sites/joelkotkin/2016/10/13/the-next-great-american-metropolis-is-taking-shape-in-texas/#2488ff405bce

The Hay Barn

One of the things we have loved most about renovating Buda Mill & Grain over the past five years have been the stories people bring us about their memories of the Mill. Many locals have reminisced about growing up in Buda and coming to the feed store.  Local Billie Grey remembered that the Mill was the first business to receive the telephone in Buda even before the doctor's office or the grocery store, pointing out the Mill's importance in the community. Another local explained just how hot it was the summer his job was cleaning out the insides of the big silos.   

One of my favorite stories came from Mr. Doherty who grew up on the Mill property in the little white house next to Sac N Pac. His father worked at the Mill and his father could remember when there was a dairy in the back south acre at a time when Buda had up to 150 local dairies.  One of Mr. Doherty's favorite memories was about the Hay Barn (304 S Main Street).  We hadn’t known what the long pole barn was used for until he told us that the feed company, Buda Milling Co. stored their hay there. But the best part of his recollection was that they also stored the corn cobs in the Hay Barn after the corn had been cut off for feed. He explained that sometimes they would have corn cob fights along Main Street in the 50's. He laughed as he pointed out just how much it hurt to be hit in the back with a flying corn cob.

When we started renovations, the Hay Barn was being rented by a man who did car repairs. After this tenant left, we removed the tin siding, trying to save the original pole barn structure. We tried multiple ways to keep the poles but the creosote coating was just too toxic to save.

Here are a few pictures of what the Hay Barn used to look like before the renovations.

 The back side of the Hay Barn

The back side of the Hay Barn

 Pole Barn

Pole Barn

 Opening on South end of building.

Opening on South end of building.

 The original pole barn structure

The original pole barn structure

 The back of the Hay barn with the old lift system still in place that was used for dumping grain. We were told that it lifted the front wheels of the truck, dumping the grain from out of the back into a large concrete subterranean tank.

The back of the Hay barn with the old lift system still in place that was used for dumping grain. We were told that it lifted the front wheels of the truck, dumping the grain from out of the back into a large concrete subterranean tank.

When we designed the new space, we kept the original foot print of the old barn and the same ridge height of the building so it would mirror the original building. We wanted to keep large posts in the building as a reminder of the history of the pole barn structure. And the new window on the south end, looking out at the silos, is a reference to the door opening from before. 

 Nate's & the Hay Barn renovated

Nate's & the Hay Barn renovated

All in the family - a team of three

In 2010, we came together as a multi-generational team made up of my mother, Gay Dahlstrom, myself, and my son Saenger Ellis. And, with that, we each brought our own unique perspectives and talents. My mom just  wanted to take care of and nurture the property she had loved for so long.  Saenger saw the potential of developing the property that is so close to Austin.  And, I wanted to work on the designs of the old barns. We are now heading into year four and have discovered that it's the unexpected collaboration between the three of us that means so much and that has been so much fun. 

 Owner Gay Dahlstrom 

Owner Gay Dahlstrom 

 Dodi Dahlstrom Ellis & Saenger Ellis in front of the old silo's

Dodi Dahlstrom Ellis & Saenger Ellis in front of the old silo's

In the midst of revival, former mill sets on to take on new life in downtown Buda

Great article on the Mill!

https://communityimpact.com/austin/city-county/2014/08/18/in-the-midst-of-revival-former-mill-set-to-take-on-new-life-in-downtown-buda-2/

 

 

Again,  the re-development of the mill would never have happened without my Mother's vision that the Mill has something great to offer the surrounding community. She fell in love with the Mill when she inherited it in the 90's and held onto it through good times and bad. And, she continues to be the one that guides Saenger and myself through the process.